Tag Archives: Sewing

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Banner 300x250(Contest closes at midnight Central time on Monday, April 6, 2015 and Craftsy will randomly draw one lucky winner which will be notified on April 7th – Good Luck!)


Sewing Tip of the Day! 

WAWAK_SEWING

NEVER use a dull seam ripper!!!!!  I buy my seam rippers in bulk from WAWAK Sewing and you should too 🙂  Then you can throw them away at the first sign of dullness and grab a new one.

Seam Rippers from WAWAK.com

 


Continue reading Enter to Win my new Craftsy Class & Fashion Sewing for Beginners!

How to Make Covered Buttons

All About Buttons!

Embellishing is one of my favorite things to do, in fact sometimes I even add touches to ready-to-wear garments.  One of the easiest ways to restyle is to change the buttons.  Even better, your own custom covered buttons!  From simple to couture, this is what I will cover in the next series of blogs.

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First, lets start with the basics on how to cover a button.  The base of the button looks just like the ones above and they come in many sizes.  There at two kinds available, I prefer the ones with what I call “teeth”, like this one from WAWAK.

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Each button has 2 parts: a top that you will wrap your fabric around and a base that snaps onto the back, securing the fabric.

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Let’s get started!

  1. Cut out a circle from your fashion fabric,  just little bit bigger than the button.

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Note:  the circle above is too large for that button, it should look more like the photo below

how to cover a button Angela Wolf5 2. Wrap the fabric around the curve of the button top, securing edges of fabric in the teeth.  If the fabric is plaid or striped, take care in placing the button and check the alignment of the shank to make sure its the same on every button.

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3. Continue all the way around until the fabric is tight and secure.

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See why I prefer the teeth, so much easier to tighten the fabric!

4. Place the backing on and snap into place with needle nose pliers.  Snap all the way around the button to make sure the back is tightly closed.

Trouble Shooting:  If you can’t snap the back of the button in place, you might have too much fabric inside.  This means the circle of fabric was too large, but you can still trim out the excess fabric to make it work.

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That’s it!  Super easy and  trend with a touch of couture 🙂

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I have quite a few more buttons to go, but this jacket has been cut and sitting in my “to do” bin for over a year!  Hand-dyed silk charmeuse lining and all, I must finish this before spring!

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One more thing about covering buttons:  A little trick that I do to make my buttons look more professional is to add a touch of cotton.  You can use cotton balls, make-up remover cotton, batting, even a thin piece of polar fleece.

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Center the cotton on the button, then wrap the fabric over the cotton.  Now when you secure the fabric tightly you won’t see any metal through the fabric and it softens the look.  Now when I want to add beading to the button I can actually get my needle through the fabric.  If you have a hard time keeping the cotton in place, use a tab of super glue, just let the glue dry before covering with fabric.

Buying Covered Buttons:

There are so many covered buttons to choose from it can get a little overwhelming, so I have included links to the ones that I use from WAWAK Sewing:

These are all 12 packs, but trust me you will go through them.  These buttons have a curved top, they also carry a flat top.

Next time I will show how I made these custom buttons:

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Hope you had a great week!  Off to work on samples for It’s Sew Easy TV taping next week.

Cheers,

Angela WolfWAWAK_SEWING_Logo_Web

 

 

 

 

What does Cooking have to do with Sewing and Serging?

First off, I want to wish you a Happy New Year and I hope you are off to a great start in 2015! So far so good on this end J

I started the year with a mini-vacation up north. Although, the snow didn’t arrive until after the mini-vacation, which resulted in another mini-vacation at home, not all bad J

yes, I took this fuzzy photo and it's on the new years list to get better
yes, I took this fuzzy photo and it’s on the new years list to get better

I am not big into New Year’s resolutions, as I would hate to set myself up for failure – that being said I still have a very long list, as I do every year:  work out, eat healthier, go to bed early and get up early, take more time for friends and family, get organized, get rid of clutter, and on and on …… I have to ask, why not just take time each month and re-evaluate life – wouldn’t it be so much easier to try changing and improving on things one month at a time versus an entire year? What a novel thought, that ultimately has become my New Year’s Resolution!

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Resolutions #1: Get in Better Shape

 

To start, I bought Jillian Michaels ripped in 30 workout DVD and a slew of new workout clothes. You can’t work out properly without the proper clothing, right? (even if I am working out in my own living room … and yes, I bought them as I didn’t have time to sew them)

Day 1: REALLY?!? Have any of you tried this workout?!? I really thought I was in pretty good shape – she had no problem proving that different! First day, thought I would die in the middle (remember this only 30 minutes – longest 30 minutes of my life!)

Day 7: Let’s just say, this is going to be re-evaluated at the end of the month – as I am SO out of shape!  And thank heaven’s I can do this in my own house and no one is taping me!!!!  Oh – and by the way – I will not be offering before and after photos! J

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Resolution #2: Learn How to Cook

 

As many of you already know, cooking is not my forte. I am not ashamed of that, as those of you that have read my book already know, for the first years out of college – my custom apparel business was my main focus and the kitchen cabinets were only to be used for fabric storage  – they made excellent storage if I might add.  My last cooking attempt was 7 years ago, 3 days of it and it was catastrophic, so let’s give it a go in 2015. What the heck, don’t they call it the 7 year itch J

First, let me just say, I have the best husband ever! Winn, loves to cook and he is really good at it, so I am a bit spoiled. In order to not starve the man the death, I will attempt cooking while he is away:

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1st Recipe: Cooking Light Magazine – Parmesan and Pine Nut – Crusted Oven-Fried Chicken  (Winn’s up north ice fishing, perfect opportunity!)

Take 1: Spent 2 hours in the grocery store trying to find all the ingredients, got home and was way too tired to attempt.

Result: Dinner served is cottage cheese and triscuits.

Take 2: Ready to go … everything went well until the “sauté the chicken for 3 minutes” and mine turned black instantly!

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I will just give you a hint, Tyler (the cat) is more like a dog and love’s people food.  Last weekend, my husbands chicken dish:

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My dish?  He snubbed, in the kindest way:

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In fact, if it wasn’t for Ranch dressing (which makes anything taste good) Tyler’s dinner was even looking a bit enticing.

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Cooking is just like Sewing!

 

This is when I realized cooking is so much like sewing! When I teach a class, I assume you know how to do certain things, just like these recipes:

  • 2 TBSP Pine nuts, toasted (for us beginners, how do you toast these – in the toaster LOL J )
  • Sauté for 3 minutes or until brown – well, mine turned black so fast, there wasn’t a brown option! (Maybe the author had a better quality pan?)
  • Cook for 10 minutes or until chicken is done: what if my oven is hotter than yours? What if I use convection cook? 

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As I am pulling a blackened chicken breast out of the oven, two things occurred to me.  Sewer’s have this same problem. For example: interfacing – What is it? What kind? Where do I put it? How do I press it in place?

I can just picture a new sewer in Joann fabrics staring at the rack of interfacing, as I am in the grocery store staring at the spice rack – totally lost!

And then the comparison of sewing machines and sergers to stoves and ovens. They are all different. I read the recipe and followed by the book, but maybe the person writing it has a gas stove, did they bake with a convection oven, or were they using a different pan?

After botching my dinner, I sat down to answer my online class questions and had to laugh when I got to one of my serging class questions: my gathering foot doesn’t gather like you showed. WOW! This is exactly what I am experiencing with cooking! My serger is different and all serger’s don’t offer the same stitch quality or feet accessories.  See where I am going? There are so many factors to creative learning.

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To improve my cooking, I have enrolled in Brendan McDermott’s Essential Cooking Techniques Class. I will let you know how it goes – no pressure Brendan, LOL!

And to help my fellow beginner sewers, I have fun plans for you this year! I can’t tell you them all yet, but my blog will feature a “Back to the Basics” section to help you learn the basics of sewing as I am learning to cook! Let’s learn together J For my advanced sewing fans, don’t worry, I have a lot in store for you too!

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Wardrobe Challenge

 

How can I ever thank you all for participating in my wardrobe challenge of 2014, the response in email, flickr, and pinterest was phenomenal. My wardrobe challenge started with the idea to inspire you to fill your closet with clothes sewn by you! The best part was getting sponsors to offer great gifts to inspire you even further: Brother, WAWAK sewing, Threads and SewStylish Magazines, Coats & Clark, It’s Sew Easy Tv, and myself. As you know, I extended the deadlines into 2015 for many reasons and look forward to awarding the final winners. This contest was an inspiration of mine to get you all to fill your closets with your own sewn clothes! I will be announcing a slew of past winners this week and giving you the last challenge for the grand prize, don’t worry the last challenge is the easiest J

Happy New Year! Can you share some of your resolutions for 2015? I would love to hear J

 

And, any tips on cleaning this pan?!?

xoxo

 

Angela Wolf

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TIPS ON HOW TO SEW FAUX LEATHER!

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Leather is a major trend this season and continues on into the spring, yes leather for spring and summer!  Here are a few tips to get you started:

TIP 1. FABRIC

Check the fabric for flaws, especially in faux leather you might find scratches or cuts that you will need to work around when cutting out the pattern pieces.

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Consider the weight and feel of the fabric for the design.  For example a biker jacket will need a thicker fabric than say a peplum style jacket.  Also, squeeze the fabric in your hand and if it has deep creases or wrinkles, that is how it will look after wearing it (better to know now :))

ANGELA WOLF SEWING LEATHER TIPS2ANGELA WOLF SEWING LEATHER TIPS1TIP 2. NEEDLES

Use a Leather Needle in the sewing machine.  Start with a size 12 or 14 for light to medium weight fabric.

Go up to a 16 or 18 for heavier fabric, but be sure to CHECK your sewing machine as to what is the largest size needle it will accommodate.  One of my older machines will only allow up to a size 14.

For sewing faux leather I prefer using a Jean Needle size 14.    If you are having a problem with skipped stitches try this needle.

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When it comes to hand-stitching, standard needles have a difficult time piercing the fabric.  Instead use a Leather Hand Needle, this needle has a triangular point that pierces the fabric.  Just be careful, the tip is REALLY sharp!

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TIP 3: NO PINS

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Just as difficult as it is to pierce leather / faux leather, once you do pierce the fabric the hole is there forever!  Use clips to hold the fabric instead of pins.  They are lightweight and don’t damage the fabric.

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I got these getta grip sewing clips from my friend Paul Gallo.  I met Paul at Craftsy while we were both shooting classes.  He showed me these clips that he designed and I have been a fan ever since.  Awesome guy!  Have you ever met Paul or taken any of his classes?

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FASHION DRAPING: DRESSMAKING BASICS with PAUL GALLO ON CRAFTSY!

 

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FASHION DRAPING: BIAS DESIGN with PAUL GALLO ONLINE CLASS ON CRAFTSY!

TIP 4: TAPING SEAM ALLOWANCES

ANGELA WOLF HOW TO SEW WITH LEATHER9When sewing garments, pressing the seam allowances open with a Tailor’s Clapper is the best option.  Unfortunately with leather, faux leather, vinyl, and suede, even if you safely press the fabric with an iron shoe, the seam allowance will not stay open.  The best solution for securing seam allowances and hemming is either topstitching or leather tape (a special double-sided tape).

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This is how easy it works:

1. Place a strip of LEATHER TAPE in the seam allowance with the sticky side down.

2. Remove paper backing, revealing the other side of the tape.

3. Fold back the seam allowance or hem allowance.

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I use the 1/4″ wide tape for seam allowances and 1/2″ wide tape for hems.  I purchase the tape from WAWAK SEWING and the rolls come 60 yards.  Don’t be caught off guard by the quantity because you will use more than you think and the price is incredible!  Well, this should get you started – next in line is quilting and embroidering faux leather.

Cheers,

Angela Wolf

 

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Are your photo’s showing up on Flickr? Wild Card Entries in the Wardrobe Challenge!

WILD CARD ENTRIES
You will notice August and September offered a Wild Card entry and there are a few reasons for this:

Wild Card

NEED HELP JOINING FLICKR?

Many of you have emailed needing help with Flickr, which is the primary method of entering the contest.  Hopefully you are getting the hang of it now, but in all fairness, if any of you need help setting up your Flickr or navigating around the site, please let me know and I will be more than happy to help you get started.

ARE YOUR PHOTOS SHOWING UP ON THE WARDROBE CHALLENGE FLICKR GROUP? 

More importantly, are your photos showing up in the Wardrobe Challenge Flickr page?  As you upload a photo for a certain challenge, make sure that you click on “add to groups” (on the left hand side) and then click on “Angela Wolf’s Wardrobe Challenge”.  After the photo is uploaded, click on the Wardrobe Challenge Flickr Group page and make sure your photo is there.  If you don’t see your photo on the group page, the judges don’t either.  Again, let me know if you need help with this, and I would be more than happy to help.

WHAT’S A WILD CARD?

The idea for this challenge is to inspire people to sew garments and fill their wardrobe with your own designs.  Of course I can’t possibly add a theme that suits everyone, so the Wild Card entries are in case you want to sew a garment outside of the themes.  Just add “Wild Card” to the description of your garment along with either the month “August” or “September” (again check that it show up on the Flickr page) and your entry will qualify for the month indicated.  Wild Card entries will be judged at the close of the official challenge and must be received by January 31, 2015.  Yes I did say January 31, 2015 – read below for details.

ON A PERSONAL NOTE …

I would like to thank everyone for participating in my wardrobe challenge.  So far, the garments are fabulous and the Pinterest page is fun too, what a great place to share inspiration!  The idea of filling my closet with my own hand-sewn apparel is a mission of mine (hope I live a long time to fulfill that one 🙂 )  and my wish is to inspire you to do the same.  I could have called this challenge a blog-athon or sew-along, but I chose to go out on a limb and ask some of my favorite sewing businesses to donate gifts and prizes – which they so generously offered; thus creating a full-blown contest.  The response has been phenomenal and I have enjoyed every bit of watching what you all are working on.  But with any long-term contest or event, some changes need to be made in order to better the experience for all involved.

This is the reason for August Wild Card month:  As I mentioned many of you were struggling with the Flickr group, I was waiting for others to reply to our emails about winning past challenges, and a few other kinks that needed to be worked out.

This was not the reason for September’s Wild Card:  I don’t usually share my personal life too much, but I think this one is important.  Labor Day weekend I was notified of my Grandmother entering the hospital.  Although it didn’t seem serious at first, she passed away shortly after.  My Grandmother was my best friend.  After losing my Grandfather 2 years ago, this was almost unbearable.

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Those of you that know me will attest that I always take all my work seriously and give 100%, if not more – even if it’s donating time working on my Wardrobe Challenge or helping a fellow sewer with a sewing dilemma.  There is a fine line though; my family comes first and always will.  So during this difficult time, which has been very emotional for me, I stepped away from the office for a short period to be with family.

On a positive note, last week I taught at the American Sewing Expo, which is as invigorating as it gets. So many of you came up and showed off your new outfits that you have been sewing in the Wardrobe Challenge.  Thanks, you really made my day and reminded me of why this challenge is going on.  So now you have 2 chances at a Wild Card Entry 🙂

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Not only that, I am extending the contest to January 31, 2015 – simply because of the Holiday’s.  Please remember this challenge is supposed to be fun and inspiring!  Now, for those that like zippers, October’s challenge is “All Zipped Up” and I have some exciting tutorials on inserting zippers coming your way this month.

cheers,

Angela Wolf

How to Create Unique Fabric by Sewing Scraps!

angelawolffringeskirt16I love sweaters and shawls, especially since I am always cold in the air-conditioned restaurants (not that we have needed air conditioning in Michigan this summer!).  Thinking of the wardrobe challenge, sweaters are one of the items that I end up buying. Yes I do know how to crochet, yet trim on a jacket is about as far as that usually ends up. A small knitting machine sits in the corner of the studio (on my bucket list to learn how to use 🙂 ).

Angela Wolf Fringe Skirt 2I was recently sewing a fringe skirt and the tweed scraps falling on the floor reminded me of meeting a women wearing a really cute, long, loosely woven (sweater looking) vest. It was at the annual conference for ASDP, so I had to ask the question that only sewer’s are allowed to ask each other “did you make that?”.  She had indeed! I was really intrigued when she mentioned using water-soluble stabilizer and scraps from her last sewing project  – yes, scraps!

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Below is an example of using scraps from my tweed skirt:

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Angela Wolf how to create fabric

Supplies needed:

WAWAK_SEWING

NOTE: WAWAK sewing has offered my readers a discount for July – yeah! 

Purchase a minimum of $30 and receive 10% off your entire order – Use coupon code WAB714 when checking out (expires July 31st) Thank them when you order, they are the best!  :))

Angela Wolf fabricate lace yarn 5

  • Lay out one layer of water-soluble stabilizer (54″ for a scarf)
  • Randomly place yarn, scraps, hairy yarn, etc.
  • Place another layer of water-soluble stabilizer (same length as the first piece)  on top of the yarns
  • Using long pins,  pin through all the layers

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  • Starting at one end, stitch down the center of the stabilizer, stitching through all the layers.  Be careful not to sew through any pins, stitch all the way to the end. (Draw a straight line down the center if you need something to follow).
  • From the center, align the edge of the presser foot with the first stitched line.  Stitch a second row, and a third, and 4th, until you get to about 1″ from the edge of the stabilizer.  (If your machine has a Laser Vision Guide, like my Brother Dreamweaver, this would be the perfect application!)

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Angela Wolf fabricate lace yarn 42

  • Continue stitching rows along the entire length of the stabilizer until you have the desired width.
  • Turn the fabric and stitch a row from side to side, across the width of the stabilizer.
  • Continue to stitch row after row until the entire length is filled.

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The width of the stitched rows depend on how tight you want the weave of the new fabric or lace.  Just be sure to keep it somewhat tight or the yarns will fall away.

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The next step is easy!  Rinse the fabric panel in warm water and watch the water-soluble stabilizer disappear or throw the fabric in the wash on a hand-wash cycle, again with warm water.

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Above you can see the stabilizer has disappeared and I am left with a loosely woven fabric.  Notice the stitching lines, this is good to keep in mind when you choose the thread color.

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Angela Wolf how to create fabric

 

 

Who would have ever guessed

our scraps

could go so far!

 

 

A few more tips:

  • Throw the fabric in the dryer to soften the hand
  • The stabilizer and yarns shrink up after washing and drying,  keep that in mind if you need a specific length.
  • The more yarn and scraps, the thicker the fabric
  • To make an outfit, stitch all the pieces together before washing out the stabilizer

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This is a great technique to use for June’s Fabricate Challenge – which I extended the deadline until July 31st.

Have you ever tried this?  If so, please share any tips you might have!

Cheers,

Angela WolfWAWAK_SEWING_Logo_Web

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer Wardrobe Challenge – Fabricate with Applique!

win-n-angel fishingMany of you have asked about the design on the cover of June’s wardrobe challenge and I can’t think of any better way to get back on the blogging roll. Where have I been hiding? Actually, I have been traveling quite a bit: some for work, visiting family, and of course getting a little fishing in.

I keep my blog notebook with me and write ideas and topics when the inspiration comes. The book is getting pretty full, so the good news is I am back from my trips and have caught up on all my crazy tight deadlines (what a breath of fresh air 🙂 ) and now I have the time to blog, yeah!

I have spent the last two weeks sewing and embroidering up a storm. I am excited to share what I have been working on and ready to get going on the wardrobe challenge … I need some summer clothes!

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June’s Challenge – Fabricate!

First, I have some great fabricating techniques to share with you; therefore, I am extending the deadline for June’s Challenge until July 31st. There will still be a separate July challenge, but with summer in most of our backyards, this will give you more time.

Fab-ri-cate (from dictionary.com unabridged – based on the Random House Dictionary)

  1. To make by art or skill and labor; construct
  2. To make by assembling parts or sections
  3. To devise or invent
  4. To fake; forge

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That definition pretty much leaves the door open for ultimate creativity, wouldn’t you say? One idea includes designing your own fabric or altering a fabric into something totally different, which is what I did with the above jacket.

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The fabric used for the applique trimming is a polyester / satin. A lightweight fabric with fabulous drape, perfect for a blouse or lining (both of which I plan to add to jacket).  That fabric, if left alone, would be a nightmare to create appliques or cut-outs, so I fabricated – sounds like a bad word 🙂 !

heat and bondThe trick – Heat N Bond, now available from my favorite place WAWAK Sewing and comes in 5 yard and 35 yard pieces. At first I wasn’t too sure about this stuff, but basically you iron it to the back of the fabric and it makes it easier for you to cut out an applique – especially if you are using the Brother Scan-n-Cut

 

 

 

This is how easy an applique can be:

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  • Choose a design – for the sleeve I enlarged a design already in the scan-n-cut memory.
  • Place the bonded fabric onto the cutting mat (the paper backing on the heat –n-bond makes it easy to stick)
  • Press the start button (told you it was easy!)

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Peel off the backing and place the appliques on the garment.

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Once you have the perfect placement, use a press cloth and press the applique in place.  Notice I attach the appliques before sewing the sleeve together.

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Even though the cut of the scan-n-cut prevents the fabric edges from fraying, I still stitch the applique in place. I choose the blanket stitch and stitched around each applique. That took some time, but it looks great.  Almost looks like leather!

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I followed all those steps for the jacket front and again used a blanket stitch.

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Of course I could cut these appliques by hand, but I really like the fact that all the front pieces are exactly the same! By the way, don’t look too closely at my studio – can you tell I have been working 🙂angela wolf #wardrobechallenge

 

Well, that’s one fun way to fabricate, much more to come.  Have you ever tried appliqueing apparel?

 

Cheers,

Angela Wolf

Creative Serging with Crochet Thread – Flatlock Stitching!

A little creative serging! I mentioned I am finishing up a serging book. The book has challenged me to play with new threads, new stitches, new serging feet, and more. I wanted to share a quick serging stitch that you might find useful for restyling or adding embellishment to one of your outfits.

How to sew with creative serging -  Angela Wolf

This is a 3-thread flatlock stitch with a decorative crochet thread in the upper looper.   The left needle and lower looper have a similar color polyester thread.  The photo above shows the front of the flatlock stitch and the backside.  The backside looks like a ladder stitch.  (the peach thread is just the serged edge of the seam).

How to sew with creative serging - Angela Wolf

I started with a basic gored skirt.  The front has 2 seams and after I finished flatlocking those two seams I decided to add embellishment to the center front.  So the center front really does not have a seam.  This would be a great way to create unique fabric!

How to sew a creative serged seam with Angela Wolf

Here is the back view.  Again there are 2 seams on each side back and this time there is a real seam down the center back with a hidden zip. In order for this stitching to look even, because of the zipper, I stitched the flat-felled embellishment down the edge of each center back seam, then added the zipper and closed the seam.  That part got a little tricky and you can see the stitches are not perfectly even.  I haven’t decided if I am going to rip it out and start again or hope nobody is looking at my tush that closely to notice 🙂

Stitch Tutorial:

  • Set your serger up for a 3-thread overlock – I will be using the Brother Project Runway 5434PRW and the standard setting for the needle and looper tensions are 4.  When I give you new tension numbers you can compare this with your machine.  If you are serging on the Babylock air-threading serger set up your serger for the 2-thread flatlock – wide.
  • Thread the upper looper (or the only looper for the 2-thread flatlock) with a decorative thread.  Use standard poly serging thread in the needle and lower looper.

 

crochet thread wawalDecorative Thread Ideas:

 

Get the idea –  be creative!


 

Next, there are a few changes to the serger settings:

Stitch Width: 5mm

Stitch Length: 2-4mm

Needle Tension:  Decrease to 0 -3 (remember my standard setting is 4 so adjust for your serger)

Upper Looper Tension:  Decrease  to 2 – 3

Lower Looper Tension: Increase to 6 – 9

Disengage the knife

These setting serve as a guide.  It will depend on the fabric and thread you end up serging with.

Blind Hem Stitch Foot

See if you have a Blind Hem Foot, if not you can use a standard foot.

There is a setting on the foot that moves to the right and left, allowing the needle to pierce more or less of the fabric.  Test the stitch on your fabric to determine the setting.

Fold the fabric in half or if you are embellishing a seam,  fold along the seam line.   Align the fabric along the shield on the blind hem foot (if using a standard foot, mark a spot to align with).

Flat lock stitching with Angela Wolf

The idea is for the needle to pierce the fabric –  half the stitch is on the fabric and half is off the fabric.  In fact the stitches look really messy coming out of the serger!

flat lock stitching with angela wolf

Stretch out the folded fabric to lie flat and press.

flat lock stitching with Angela Wolf

Pretty simple, but so fun!  Have you ever tried this before?  I would love some more ideas for decorative threads or yarns to use with this stitch.

wawak brother serger 1034D
Sale on Brother Serger at http://www.wawak.com

Today is officially the end of National Serging month, did any of you pick up a good deal on a serger?

If you are thinking of adding a basic serger to the sewing room, really inexpensively, take a look at this Brother 1034D – on sale for $217 and free shipping!  I had to double-check that, kind of thought it was a misprint  🙂  I have no idea how long the sale is on for or how many are in stock, but that is a great deal.

I will post March’s winners tomorrow evening.  Don’t forget to get April’s photos posted on Flickr and share your pinterest board before Thursday!  Good luck everyone 🙂

Looking for more creative serging ideas?  Join my on Craftsy with 50% OFF today!
Looking for more creative serging ideas? Join my online class Creative Serging – Beyond the Basics. Click here to get 50% OFF today!

xoxo

Angela Wolf

 

 

 

Spring Cleaning! Organize the Sewing Room with Thread Racks

Spring is such a great time to clean and organize … two of my least favorite terms :) One of the biggest clutter issues in a sewing room is thread, I want to share a few ideas for organizing:

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Hang numerous thread racks on different walls to organize spools of thread by color and content.  Although you can’t tell by this photo, I organize the neutral colors in one area, green and blues in another, red, yellow and orange in another, etc.  I also use the top row for topstitching and other specialty threads.

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There is a separate section for serger thread.  When I  run out of pegs on the rack, I hang one cone of a specific color with a sticker that lists the quantity. Then I store the other cones in a cabinet below.

angela wolf thread organizing wawakSpeaking of serger thread, I leave one serger thread rack on the table with the sergers and coverstitch machines.  This is a quick way to hold the spools I am using and prevent them from cluttering the sewing area and rolling off the table!

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Here is a fun spool holder!    The base rotates so it’s easy to find a thread and the pegs are long enough for serger cones.  Another option is coordinating the bobbin and the thread color together, both fit perfectly on one peg.

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You have to assemble this rack, which only takes a few minutes, but that offers additional options  for organizing.

I find myself only using the bottom half of the rack.  With the lower half I can load up on weight with heavy spools and the rack is not tippy.   Another idea is to use the thread spools at the bottom and smaller spools or bobbins on the top half.

Speaking of bobbins, I always order an extra 50 for each machine.  There are so many colors I use frequently and I don’t enjoy unspooling the bobbin so I can use a new color.  Not only is that a waste of thread, that extra thread attaches to my clothes for the day!  To organize all the bobbins, I use a plastic container  with a lid.  These stack neatly and the lid keeps the dust out.

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Check out this magnetic bobbin holder.   I keep one of these next to my Brother PQ1500 and one next to my commercial machine since those are the only machines I have with metal bobbins.

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For the machines that have plastic bobbins, I either use the turning thread holder shown above, the plastic thread container, or a smaller thread rack free-standing on the table.

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In case you haven’t seen WAWAK Sewing’s April magazine with the sale of the month, ALL the thread racks are $5 off (and don’t forget shipping is free if you spend over $100 – which is easy to do with all the great items they have :))

Now, back to writing the serging book.  I do have a serging technique I think you will like, I hope to share that with you tomorrow.  How are you doing on April’s wardrobe challenge Simply Serged?

Cheers,

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Product Review – Hug Snug Seam Binding for Hemming

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There are so many sewing products on the market, it can get overwhelming trying to decide which ones to try.  Here is one for you … Hug-Snug Seam Binding.  Take a look inside some of your nicer pants and skirts, you will often see a rich looking ribbon covering the hem allowance edge.  Hug-Snug is probably the ribbon you see.  This ribbon is 100% Rayon, has a satin finish and it comes in a TON of colors.

Angela Wolf Hug-Snug WAWAK8 Regardless if you are sewing a garment from scratch or doing alterations, this is a fast, professional looking hem and it’s really easy:

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Press up the hem.  Working on the right side of the fabric, align the ribbon over the raw edge of the hem allowance.

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The edge of the fabric should land in the middle of the ribbon.  Stitch along the edge of the ribbon.  (I am using contrasting color ribbon and thread so it’s easier to see :))

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The above photo shows the single stitch line and how the ribbon covers the fabric raw edge.

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Attach the ribbon all the way around the hem.  When you get to the end, trim the ribbon leaving 2″ – 3″ extra.

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Stitch  just past the starting point …

… fold under the end of the ribbon, enclosing the raw edge of the ribbon.

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Turn the fabric and stitch the folded edge of the ribbon in place.

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The ribbon is attached, covering all raw edges.  Hem the garment as usual, using the edge of the ribbon as the hem allowance edge.  The ribbon is so much thinner than fabric and really makes a perfect blind hem!    Below I am using a blind hem machine:

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Notice how the ribbon edge is connected to the garment, finishing the hem.  If using the blind hem stitch on a sewing machine or hand-stitching the hem in place, do the same thing; connect the edge of the ribbon to the fabric.

I told you it’s easy!  Again, Hug-Snug Seam Binding comes in a ton of colors:

Hug Snug colors WAWAK

I borrowed this color chart from WAWAK SEWING SUPPLIES.  In fact, if you want to give this product a try, WAWAK is offering 10% off until March 31st.

How are the jeans coming along for the wardrobe challenge?  Don’t forget to upload your photos to the Flickr group, there are some really cute outfits showing up 🙂

Cheers,

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