Tag Archives: laser vision guide

How to Create Unique Fabric by Sewing Scraps!

angelawolffringeskirt16I love sweaters and shawls, especially since I am always cold in the air-conditioned restaurants (not that we have needed air conditioning in Michigan this summer!).  Thinking of the wardrobe challenge, sweaters are one of the items that I end up buying. Yes I do know how to crochet, yet trim on a jacket is about as far as that usually ends up. A small knitting machine sits in the corner of the studio (on my bucket list to learn how to use 🙂 ).

Angela Wolf Fringe Skirt 2I was recently sewing a fringe skirt and the tweed scraps falling on the floor reminded me of meeting a women wearing a really cute, long, loosely woven (sweater looking) vest. It was at the annual conference for ASDP, so I had to ask the question that only sewer’s are allowed to ask each other “did you make that?”.  She had indeed! I was really intrigued when she mentioned using water-soluble stabilizer and scraps from her last sewing project  – yes, scraps!

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Below is an example of using scraps from my tweed skirt:

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Angela Wolf how to create fabric

Supplies needed:

WAWAK_SEWING

NOTE: WAWAK sewing has offered my readers a discount for July – yeah! 

Purchase a minimum of $30 and receive 10% off your entire order – Use coupon code WAB714 when checking out (expires July 31st) Thank them when you order, they are the best!  :))

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  • Lay out one layer of water-soluble stabilizer (54″ for a scarf)
  • Randomly place yarn, scraps, hairy yarn, etc.
  • Place another layer of water-soluble stabilizer (same length as the first piece)  on top of the yarns
  • Using long pins,  pin through all the layers

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  • Starting at one end, stitch down the center of the stabilizer, stitching through all the layers.  Be careful not to sew through any pins, stitch all the way to the end. (Draw a straight line down the center if you need something to follow).
  • From the center, align the edge of the presser foot with the first stitched line.  Stitch a second row, and a third, and 4th, until you get to about 1″ from the edge of the stabilizer.  (If your machine has a Laser Vision Guide, like my Brother Dreamweaver, this would be the perfect application!)

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Angela Wolf fabricate lace yarn 42

  • Continue stitching rows along the entire length of the stabilizer until you have the desired width.
  • Turn the fabric and stitch a row from side to side, across the width of the stabilizer.
  • Continue to stitch row after row until the entire length is filled.

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The width of the stitched rows depend on how tight you want the weave of the new fabric or lace.  Just be sure to keep it somewhat tight or the yarns will fall away.

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The next step is easy!  Rinse the fabric panel in warm water and watch the water-soluble stabilizer disappear or throw the fabric in the wash on a hand-wash cycle, again with warm water.

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Above you can see the stabilizer has disappeared and I am left with a loosely woven fabric.  Notice the stitching lines, this is good to keep in mind when you choose the thread color.

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Angela Wolf how to create fabric

 

 

Who would have ever guessed

our scraps

could go so far!

 

 

A few more tips:

  • Throw the fabric in the dryer to soften the hand
  • The stabilizer and yarns shrink up after washing and drying,  keep that in mind if you need a specific length.
  • The more yarn and scraps, the thicker the fabric
  • To make an outfit, stitch all the pieces together before washing out the stabilizer

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This is a great technique to use for June’s Fabricate Challenge – which I extended the deadline until July 31st.

Have you ever tried this?  If so, please share any tips you might have!

Cheers,

Angela WolfWAWAK_SEWING_Logo_Web

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Princess Embroidery on Silk

First off, thanks so much for the embroidery tips!  I started with simply adding letters on sueded silk, just trying to get a grip on rotating the word and changing the overall size.  I am happy to announce, embroidering letters is much easier than I thought.

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I choose a font from the Brother Dreamweaver XE and all you have to do is push the letters on the touch screen.  Changing from upper case to lower case is a breeze.  Then another push of the button and the entire word rotated directions.  (I know I said no monogram towels for Christmas gifts, but I think I changed my mind – this is way too much fun!  Now I just need the machine to offer spell check :))

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So here is where I screwed up … I was in a hurry and  grabbed a bobbin that was 1/3 full.  Instead of taking all that thread off the bobbin and starting fresh, I added more thread to that bobbin.  Not a big deal, unless you run out of bobbin thread!   This sewing machine has an automatic sensor that tells you when you are going to run out of thread.  Very cool feature, unless the machine doesn’t know you are going to run out of thread, which is exactly what happened here.  I was lucky the thread ran out at the end of my first “S”, but I still had to line up another “S” or change my idea to Princes (on pink fabric).  I played around with the laser light and found that I could tell the machine where to start the last letter.  Not too shabby!

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I have big design ideas for my newly found passion for embroidery, but for the first few tests I am going to work on small pieces of fabric and share with those of you that are as much a novice as I am on this.

A few emails rolled in about how exactly to embroidery the jeans and I thought this photo might help.  Remember there were 3 hoopings on each leg.  The front pockets were already attached and the back was finished, except for the back pocket.  I waited to add the back pocket because I was worried the fabric would be too thick under the embroidery hoop.  You can see how the design started large near the hip, then smaller, and then even smaller at the ankle.

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I am off to buy more embroidery thread and needles.  Thanks to many of you for your advice, I think this is going to be fun.  In the next post I will show you what the Princess is for and add more texture to the fabric.  Have a great week!  Cheers 🙂  Angela